Archive for the 'surf' Category

SRI LANKA TOURISM BOARD… Mentions AbaY!

Nice! To see that Arugam Bay is being mentioned.
Sad  that this promotion used totally wrong images. Causing dismay to the entire Surf Community.

This just in from London. Carve reader Will Robertson sent in this pic of a Sri Lanka tourist board ad which is all over London underground.

“It’s been a while since I last surfed A Bay, but judging from this poster on the wall of the London tube the reef must have shifted and it’s got a lot more square. And Fanning’s doing a good job of surfing it switch too.

It’s definitely a “different kind of surf” – quite literally.

Oh how lazy ad people can miss some fundamentals – thought I would share the love.”

Not sure what is more annoying. Using a wave from a totally different ocean as A Bay (A Bay is actually very fun in its own right). The sacrilege of putting Mick the wrong way round. Or the irony that we actually emailed Sri Lanka tourist board to offer a bit of help before Christmas and they ignored our emails.

If you want a campaign done right, maybe hire surfing art director?

http://www.carvemag.com/2017/03/sri-lanka-tourism-board-fail/#.WMzTHmxuVo4.facebook

Surf Competition in July

Red Bull Ride my Wave Competition

Arugam Bay gets ready for Red Bull Ride My Wave
Details and online Entry Form

On 23rd July, Red Bull Ride My Wave returns to the Sri Lanka’s surf capital, Arugam Bay.

Red Bull Surf Competition at Arugam Bay

Red Bull Surf Competition at Arugam Bay

Competing surfers will take on the waves in a head to head competition to be crowned champion of Red Bull Ride My Wave 2015.

Driven by the popularity of the 2014 event, this year’s edition of Red Bull Ride My Wave will see domestic and international surfers compete over three days on the island’s eastern coastline.

Red Bull Ride My Wave will be hosted by officials from the Association of Surfing Professionals, who will run the event as per international surfing rules and regulations, including three days of heats before culminating in the Finals on July 25th

The islanders will play with home advantage, but will no doubt face stiff competition from the international surfers. The combination of home grown and international talent promises to promote Sri Lanka as one of the best surfing destinations.

Red Bull has been actively involved in surfing events for several years, hosting competitions on every continent around the world. Surfing in Sri Lanka has seen a considerable movement from being a healthy pastime and tourism tool to one of professional sport. This has been driven by both passionate surfers within the country and Red Bull’s very own series of surfing projects. In 2013, Red Bull Sri Lanka held the Local Hero Tour with Peruvian Pro Surfer, Gabriel Villarán, who ran workshops and judged an intense competition where 30 young Sri Lankans showcased their talent on the beaches of Arugam Bay. The success of this event set the foundation for an international surfing stage in Sri Lanka, activating the inaugural Red Bull Ride My Wave last year. The competition pitted the sport’s greatest local surfers from the Eastern and Southern waters against each other in a quest to determine which region was home to the island’s best surfers. Hosted by Costa Rican Pro Surfer, Diego Naranjo, the East Coast team emerged victorious and went on to represent Sri Lanka at Red Bull Both Ways in the Maldives, where they placed 2nd, 3rd and 4th respectively.

To register for Red Bull Ride My Wave 2015, sign up before July 19th 2015 at

www.redbull.com/ridemywave.

Red Bull  Background Info.

Red Bull
Background Info.

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Healing waters

BeitragVerfasst am: 06.08.2005 08:23    Titel:

Surfen in Arugam
Antworten mit Zitat

‘Healing watersCarolyn Fry finds that surfing is helping one Sri Lankan resort to get back on its feet after the tsunami

Tuesday August 2, 2005

Alan Stokes takes on the surf at Arugam Bay. Photograph: Carolyn Fry

On a sweeping stretch of cinnamon sand, a crowd turned its eyes to the rolling ocean surf. Local families, holiday-makers and a throng of photographers, film-makers and journalists were gathering to see the 2005 Champion of Champions surf contest in Arugam Bay, south-east Sri Lanka.
As a new day’s sun burned the sand through the fronds of coconut palms, surfers launched themselves into the water to ride the swell in a ballet of curving turns, speeding glides and twists of spray. The Boxing Day tsunami ripped through this sleepy beachside village, but the Indian Ocean’s barrelling waves are helping the community get back on its feet.

The legendary ‘right-handers’ of Arugam Bay have long attracted travelling wave-riders. During the country’s 20-year civil war, a dedicated group of Australian surfers regularly risked being bombed, or shot in cross-fire during violent battles between Tamil Tigers and the army. With the end of the conflict in 2002, more adventurers started to make the 10-hour journey along narrow, pitted roads to the famed beach.

Last year, when the British Professional Surfing Association (BPSA) held the first ever Champions surfing competition in the area it seemed things were finally looking up for this dusty, laid-back cluster of low-rise hotels, palm-roofed cabanas and fishermen’s shacks.

A message posted on the Siam View Hotel’s website at Christmas said: “The 2004 season has been the best the bay has ever seen. Nothing – not even another civil war – can stop the bay’s progress now.”

Hours later, the first of eight waves struck, sucking a metre of sand from the base of palms on Arugam Point, plucking cabanas and their inhabitants from the sand and smashing a thickening cargo of debris through the windows of the buses on the main street.

Simon, owner of the unfortunately named Tsunami Hotel, was managing the Siam View that night. He awoke to find himself underwater with his leg trapped. After breaking his ankle to free himself he was swept through several dwellings by the murky, diesel-tainted current before managing to grasp hold of some building blocks. This stopped Simon being swept out to sea as the water receded back to the horizon. Today, his faded superman tattoo has been supplemented by a fresh turquoise inking of a tsunami, along with the date he survived against all odds.

Following the tsunami, the organisers of the surfing contest were in two minds as to whether it should go ahead this year. A third of Arugam Bay’s 3,000 inhabitants had been killed in the disaster, money pledged by charities was slow in reaching the village and the bridge carrying the main road into Arugam Bay had been breached by the waves, cutting the community off for a short period.

However, when the bridge reopened in April the organisers decided the competition should take place. They felt that bringing 100 people into the village would serve as an impetus to get hotels rebuilt as soon as possible as well as injecting much-needed cash into the local economy.

“Everyone worked very, very hard to put it in place,” said Ralph Pereira, managing director of Travel and Tours Anywhere, which developed the contest in conjunction with Sri Lankan Airlines and the BPSA. “We didn’t know for sure that it would go ahead or whether there would be sufficient hotel rooms until six weeks beforehand.”

Guesthouse owners had certainly been hurrying to rebuild and reopen rooms damaged by the tsunami. At Hideaway Guesthouse, where I was staying, the front part of the garden was still a building site. But the main building, with its colonial tea plantation feel was homely and clean, with plump pink and orange cushions brightening rattan chairs.

Before the tsunami, surfing had been a mainstay of the tourism economy right around Sri Lanka’s southern coastline. The island’s south-west has the best waves from November to April, the south-east from May to September.

When Arugam Bay’s right-handers tailed off with the onset of the monsoon, surfers simply headed west to Hikkaduwa, where plentiful hotels and beach villas stood among lush gardens of banana and bourganvillia.

Recreating this surfers’ paradise in the wake of the tsunami has not been easy; with compensation payments from the government yet to materialise, most tourism enterprises have had to rely on their own funds to rebuild their businesses.

“We lost all our watersports equipment,” explained Thilak Weerasinghe, managing director of Lanka Sportreizen. “I didn’t get a cent, but luckily we had built up the business and can afford to rebuild.”

The Travel Foundation and Association of Independent Tour Operators (Aito) are working with the Sri Lankan government, local communities and environmental groups to help people affected by the tsunami regain their livelihoods by developing responsible tourism initiatives.

A number of projects have been earmarked for assistance, including a plan to create a sustainable fishing village. Visitors will see fish being brought to shore and sold, enabling fishermen to benefit from tourism while maintaining their traditional role in society.

Another scheme aims to revegetate land affected by the tsunami, using native plant species. This will include research into using mangroves for coastal protection. Funding for the projects will come from money already pledged by Aito members and donations from customers.

Back in Arugam Bay, there are plans to use money raised by the UK surfing fraternity to build a community surf foundation. Tsunami Surf Relief UK (TSRUK) has so far raised £30,000 through charity auctions and events and has allocated a third of this to building a new surf centre. As well as being a focal point where local surfers can meet, the foundation will help generate cash by offering board hire and surfing lessons to visiting tourists.

“We felt the community would benefit from having a centre offering surf-board hire and perhaps swimming lessons and life-guarding,” explained Phil Williams, national director of Christian Surfers UK and a trustee of TSRUK. “The break at Arugam Point is world famous for its waves and surfers from around the world go specifically to that area. In the three or four years after the ceasefire and before the tsunami, more and more surfers were coming to A-Bay; it was a much more prosperous place than before they came.”

As the surfing contest hotted up there was something of a party atmosphere on the beach. Dozens of coloured flags rippled in the tropical wind along the path to Arugam Point where glassy turquoise waves curled invitingly around the reef.

Judges assessed surfers on their turns, style and risk-taking, while waiting competitors nervously flexed their muscles, waxed their boards and contemplated their chances of winning the £2,000 prize money.

For the Sri Lankan surfers, many of whom lost friends and family in the tsunami, preparing for the contest helped them overcome their fear of the ocean. As each entered the water, the 100 or so villagers seated beneath the palm trees lining the shore cheered and whistled their support.

“The contest has been hugely important for morale after the tsunami,” said Phil Williams. “It’s sent out the message that, while Arugam Bay isn’t quite yet open for business as usual, it’s back on the tourist trail.”

Way to go

Getting there: Sri Lankan Airlines (020-8538 2001

), offers 11 flights a week from Heathrow to Colombo. Fares start at £450 return plus taxesWhere to stay: Travel and Tours Anywhere Ltd (0208 8136622) offers surfing holidays to Arugam Bay and Hikkaduwa. A 15-day holiday to Arugam Bay including flights, transfers and B&B accommodation in a guest house costs from £699pp. 14 days in Hikkaduwa costs from £599pp. Hire of boards and surfing lessons can be arranged

When to go: The waves at Arugam Bay are best between May and September during the dry season. During the off-season, Sri Lanka’s main surf spot on the south-west coast, Hikkaduwa, has good waves

Further information: Sri Lanka Tourist Board (020-7930 2627), arugambay.com’

http://travel.guardian.co.uk/c…..60,00.html

Continue reading ‘Healing waters’

South seeks revenge at Red Bull Ride My Wave – second leg

After being shown up on home waters, the best surfers from Sri Lanka’s South Coast are out to settle the score against their Eastern counterparts in the second and final leg of Red Bull Ride My Wave, which gets under way at three popular surf spots in Arugam Bay
from the 8th to the 10th of August.

8th, 9th and 10th August

With an excellent mixture of swell, wind, tide and sunny skies, the South Coast finished with 142.3 points after the opening skirmishes on their territory earlier in the year, well below the East’s final tally of 164.8 points. This means they have no option but to go for broke with their best tricks from double barrels to cut backs and sprays. Whilst, the East team which ruled the first leg of Red Bull Ride My Wave held in March, will seek a repeat of their previous dominance in order to complete their surf supremacy over the South team. All this sets the scene for an electric display of surfing. Continue reading ‘South seeks revenge at Red Bull Ride My Wave – second leg’

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Kite Surfer and the MH370 Mystery

Kite Surfer returns from the Bondives


Kite Surfer and the MH370 Mystery

World Exclusive News

Kite Surf Legend Dill Sill recovering at nearby KaputtoVille hospital.
He was Blown off course and badly crash landed at AbaY today.
He is dilsirious, but he has indicated a possible explanation to what may have happened to the missing Malay flight MH 370

Crashed at AbaY beach - blown way off course

Drifted in from the distant Bondives

Attempted Kite Surfing in the Bondives

World class Kite Surfing legend Mr. Dill Sill seems to have been blown across from the previously unknown island of The Bondives to all the way to Arugam Bay.

His somewhat incoherent account is being questioned.
He claims that The Bondives Islanders reported a ‘low level flight’
However, his helmet camera has captured this amazing photo.
Which is the last known image of the missing Boeing 777:

Due to the isolation of the Island Nation of The Bondives this has only just now been reported. A group of Natives as well as the one only Police man on the island have seen a large aircraft a few weeks ago.

Did MH370 BonDive nr. AbaY ?

(artist’s impression)

Why does this news only come in NOW?

Because:

It happened in the uncharted Islands of The Bondives

You have never heard of them?

No wonder! Here is why:
(Extract from Wikipedia)

The Bondives

Are an island nation in the Southern Indo-Pacific Ocean.

The Bondives are almost unknown. And they not even shown on any maps. The reason has just come to light: Those islands are shifting. Continuously.

The most singular feature of The Bondives geography is its mobility. Similar to the annual shifting of the famous ARUGAM BAY sand bank, The BONDIVES have a constant process of erosion that removes sand from the east coast and deposit it on the west coast, the islands were moving westward at the rate of 1400 meters a year. It is anticipated that the islands would collide with Sri Lanka in 2020. To slow down this movement, boats constantly ferry sand from the east coast back to the west.

First known mention of the Bondive Islands

:noframe
Flag
:San Serriffe (02).png
Quick Facts
Capital Feemal
Government undemocratic republic
Currency dimes Roman (dR)
Area 692.7 sq km
Population 1,782,724 (1973 census)
Language English (official),Portuguese (official), Gowdy (Flong), Malay,Arabic
Religion Asterism, Hinduism, Islam, Christianity, Zoroastrianism
Electricity 190V/42Hz (South African plug)
Internet TLD .ss
Time Zone UTC +6:45

Other destinations

Understand

Map of The Bondives

Long unfairly neglected by travelers, and surprisingly never even mentioned in the backpack bible ‘Loony Planet”, the islands of The Bondives truly offer something for everyone: a rich culture full of fascinating customs, an informative case study for environmentalists and economists, and a treasure trove of unusual tubers for botanists. Now under nominally democratic government, now is the time to discover The Bondives distinctive cuisine, tropical climate and quaint transportation, before the next volcanic eruption occurs.

Economy

The Bondives have been unkindly characterized as a banana republic, although Bondivians themselves have been known to take offense at this suggestion and physically remind the commentator that pineapples are also an important export crop. (Critics must also concede that it’s not really much of a republic, either.) Continue reading ‘Kite Surfer and the MH370 Mystery’

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The rising tide in Lankan surfing

The Rising Tide in S. L. Surfing

From Arugam Bay with its legions of thunderous marching waves to the enchantingly golden seas and beaches along the southern coastline, surfing in Sri Lanka has seen a sizable structural shift. From existing entirely as a healthy pastime and tourism tool, in recent years it has thrown on a thicker cloak of sporting legitimacy, stitched together by a collection of passionate practitioners and benevolent organizers of surfing projects and competitions.

Sri Lanka on March 15th, 2014

Last week saw the beginning of one such helpful competition, Red Bull Ride My Wave, a unique local surfing tournament which matches up surfers from the country’s two renowned hubs for the sport, the eastern and southern coasts.

By doing this the competition aims to discover the island’s best surfers, foster friendly rivalry and promote and develop the sport. The competition is being staged in a two-leg format, with the opening round in the south coast ending on March 15 before action resumes in Arugam Bay from August 5-7.

Surfing on unfamiliar waters, the men from the east nevertheless managed to pull off an upset, spearheaded by Asanka, a name synonymous with the sport locally. Asanka’s imaginative over-water artillery outgunned anything anyone else could pull out of their arsenal and helped him ride away with the opening leg’s top surfer title.

Surfers at Mirissa

“I am delighted with the result. It is a reflection of the hard work of each surfer. It was an honour to captain this team,” Asanka revealed.

“This is going to be good for the future of surfing in Sri Lanka. I am also very proud to be named the best surfer from the three heats as there are many good surfers on both teams.” Continue reading ‘The rising tide in Lankan surfing’

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A Scotsman at Arugam

At a friend’s wedding recently, about halfway through the best man’s speech, I suddenly realised I was embarrassed about something I’d never been embarrassed about before.

Back in the late 1990s, when my family lived in the Sri Lankan capital, Colombo, my brother and I, still in our teens, took full advantage of the island’s enticing surf geography, exploring the reef breaks of Hikkaduwa on the west coast and the endless point break at Arugam Bay on the east  Coast.

A surfer at Arugam Bay, Sri Lanka, in 1998, when the area was outside the government declared safe zone

The journey to Arugam was a bit of a mission, involving a long, noisy overnight bus ride and bleary-eyed stop-and-searches at various military checkpoints on the way into Eastern Province, but at this stage in Sri Lanka’s history, hostilities between the Tamil Tiger separatists and government forces were at a relatively low ebb, so Arugam, although sandwiched between two parts of the country deemed out of bounds, was considered quite safe. As a result, during the dry summer months, when Colombo and the west coast were battered by monsoonal rains, Arugam was busy with tourists, and in particular surf tourists – mostly Australians and a few Brits – happy to put up with the gruelling bus journey and basic living conditions in exchange for days on end of perfect, warm-water waves.

Arugam was heaven, but as with all popular surf spots there was a pecking order. When a big set rolled in, the wild-eyed, tangle-haired Aussies living in the jungle on rice, water and whatever bugs they could catch got priority, and everyone else had to wait their turn. There were plenty of waves to go around, but in between sets there was much talk of other spots nearby, almost as good as Arugam but – because they were outside the government declared safe zone – going completely unridden, day after day, season after season. One of these waves was called Okanda Point, and when my friend Phil flew out from the UK for a little surf safari, we decided we’d try and ?find it.

The road running south out of Arugam had been closed by the army, so the only way in to Okanda was by boat, and for that we’d need to find a fisherman who was prepared to take us. Thanks to some subtle enquiries from our friend Gamini, who ran the B&B where we were staying, we found a guy who would ferry us there for a reasonable fee. He hardly spoke any English, so Gamini translated the rules for us before we left: “He’ll take you to Okanda, but no further; he doesn’t want to drop you too close to the shore so you’ll have to paddle in to the break; he’ll motor against the current while you surf so he can keep you in sight; and when he starts waving it means he’s running out of fuel, so you’ll need to paddle straight back to the boat.” We agreed, and ten minutes later, Phil and I were sitting in a little fibreglass skiff, bouncing in and out of a promising five-foot swell and heading – technically, at least – into a war zone.

Which brings us back to that wedding – Phil’s wedding – and his brother’s best man’s speech. After winding up a choice anecdote about Phil’s early sartorial choices he glugged a bit more champagne and said: “And then, of course, there was the time Phil and Roger went surfing in a war zone…” I’d never had a problem with our Okanda adventure before, but – stated baldly like that – the whole idea made me cringe. It made us sound like Jeremy Clarkson and AA Gill racing tanks in Iraq. “There’s a war there? Great! Let’s go and get some extreme kicks!”

All of a sudden, I felt like the most culturally insensitive guy in the room.

Still, at least Phil and I have the excuse of having been young and naive. Ever since the wedding, I’ve become increasingly aware of how the extreme sports industry and associated media are using conflict zones as backdrops for films and magazine articles. Take, for example, this idiotic headline to a recent feature in a national paper about climbing on Nanga Parbat: “Facing down terrorism on the killer mountain”. Subtext: climbers are gnarly, but these guys are even gnarlier – they climb in a place where terrorists are trying to kill them! Extreme sports are supposed to be about celebrating life, not fetishising death; somehow, somewhere along the line we seem to have forgotten that.

source:
http://www.scotsman.com/lifestyle/roger-cox-extreme-sports-should-celebrate-life-1-3273325

Hauling across the waves of Arugam Bay

The Sunday Times:

Well before the sun makes its patient ascent into the sky’s magnificent canvas of crimson, blue and white, Gabriel Villaran’s silhouette is etched against Arugam Bay’s think sand dunes.

Ready for the swell in Arugam's crystal clear waters

With his sleek surf board tucked like a wand under his arm, one of the world’s top surf stars makes a beeline to the brilliant blue sea, to conjure his unique magic on the rising tide.

Gliding majestically across the waves, Gabriel evokes two powerful and distinctly different emotions.

First there is the passion which seems to constantly linger over him during his entire time in the water, mottled with boyish exuberance and excitement.

And then a sort of naked aggression, present in each graceful twist of his lithe and muscle-bound body, as he battles to master the raging waters.

The 29-year-old Peruvian has now had plenty of opportunities to size up the seas of Arugam Bay and has seemingly blended seamlessly with its surroundings.

When he first arrived at the popular surf destination in 2010 for official competition, Gabriel realised that the waters near A-Bay possessed huge potential for the adrenaline-fueled acrobatic maneuvers he regularly pulls off.

This understanding prompted Gabriel to respond positively when Red Bull searched its pool of surfers for a suitable candidate to lead its Local Hero Tour in Sri Lanka and the Maldives, and unearth a top surfer from each country.

“When they asked for a volunteer athlete from Red Bull I was like, ‘Yea I want to come’.

That’s why it is so important to have international contests because then you show the world that you guys have good waves and a nice country,” Gabriel explains.

Gabriel quickly re-immersed himself in the waters and ways of Arugam Bay, mentoring the gifted local surfers on the finer points of the sport while grabbing every possible chance to test his own considerable powers in the waters.

His artistry at the crest of each wave and his rugged good looks easily communicate why Gabriel is such a top-ranked surfer on the international circuit as well as a global poster child for the sport.

His fearlessness while surfing is exemplified by his regular participation in Big Wave events, which pit participants against tsunami-sized walls of water.

Surf sites across the internet are littered with videos of Gabriel navigating these gigantic waves, which would leave most people paralyzed with fear.

For Gabriel though, these monstrous bodies of water are enormous caches of adrenaline and once on them he is a sight to behold.

His arms confidently outstretched and eyes aflame with focus, he waits crouched in anticipation for the right moment to unleash his own flood of creativity.

Back at Arugam Bay, the waves, although smaller, propose their own unique field of obstacles to Gabriel and a battalion of other surfers from Sri Lanka and the rest of the world.

“It’s a really good wave. It’s a proper wave. It’s long and has good sections which you can do a lot of stuff on. It’s really hard to find a wave like this. There is a lot of potential here and a lot of potential for the near future,” Gabriel opines.

This environment has fashioned a fine bevy of Lankan surfers, and the Red Bull Local Hero Tour threw a bright spotlight on the best of them.

After several rounds of competition and a series of lectures from Gabriel, Praneeth Sadaruwan was crowned the country’s Local Hero, after he was found to be the surfer who demonstrated the most promise in the water while also proving to be the most receptive to the advice given.

Praneeth, who is now in the Maldives with Gabriel helping him search for their Local Hero, says that he benefited greatly from Gabriel’s guidance and would continue to adorn his style and preparation with the technical nuggets and training tips he received.

“Everyone learnt a lot from Gabriel. He kept saying you’re doing good but you need to keep trying new things and do them properly. So he taught us very well,” Praneeth revealed.

After he is done with the pristine beaches of the Maldives, Gabriel will pick up his board and head back into Big Wave competition in his continual quest for the perfect wave and a top place finish.

“The Big Wave event has five contests a year with the biggest waves in the world. Right now I’m in the top six in the world and in the near future I would like to make it into top three and eventually go on to win the title.”

His career is likely to haul him across varying pattern of waves, cultures and people.

If the unrestrained love he expresses for the Arugam Bay surfing landscape is a suitable barometer for his future travel plans, Sri Lanka is likely to see a lot more of Gabriel Villaran and his exhilarating brand of surfing.

http://www.sundaytimes.lk/sport-news/35650-surfing-hauling-across-the-varying-pattern-of-waves-of-arugam-bay.html

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Arugam Surf Classic

Mid Year Festival

Surf, Socialise & PARTY!

This year’s awesome 3 day event has begun this morning at famous Surf Point

Every night there will be a variety of local Entertainment.
Food stalls, licensed bars, live music events and more.
All venues are totally FREE to attend – as it is Arugam’s long standing tradition
“Ladies walk in Free”
All (well behaved) men also!

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The Essence of AbaY

AbaY - in a nutshell 😉

Arugam Information -SUMMARY-

Arugam Bay, the surfer’s paradise

(March to October)
a useful summary & description.

Surf, Beach, Lagoon, Village, Beautiful Inland Landscape, Jungle, Elephant Rock & Crocodile Rock

Arugam Bay is one of the TOP 10 surf points in the world. It is also a pristine sandy beach of stunning natural beauty. Arugam Bay’s proximity to Lahugala National Park & Yala East National Park makes it a unique surfing beach.

Ladies & Lady Surfers are happy in remote AbaY

Location

Arguam Bay is located 320 km from Colombo. Some 60km due east from Monaragala, Arugam Bay is a tiny fishing village 3km south of the small fishing village of Pottuvil (12000 inhabitants) at the remote southern end of the Eastern coast & on the edge of Yala East National Park.

To the beach

The journey to the beach here takes you across some attractive meadows teeming with wildlife.

Orientation

The bay lies between two headlands & is excellent for surfing.

Beach

The wide, sweeping sandy beach in front of the village is an attraction for swimming all year-round. The beach is usually deserted, except at the southwest corner, where some fishing boats & thatch huts reveal the tiny fishing village of Ulla, just to the south of the guest house area. This is also the safest area for swimming.

Surf

‘The Point’ in Arugam Bay is regarded as a top world surf destination. It is a well lined up right hand point break, generating a clean peeling glassy wave that barrels a surfer a 400m ride right through to the inside. Additionally there are four or five high quality breaks within a radius of 30 minutes. Continue reading ‘Arugam Information -SUMMARY-‘

No Need!

NO NEED !
To bring you own board !
Arugam Bay has plenty of Surf Shops
And low daily rentals

c/c “Arugam Surf”

Image & caption taken from “Arugam Surf” on Facebook.
A popular page with 144,000 ‘Likes’
and more than 60 Million friends-of-friends
www.facebook.com/aragum

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Sigiriya and Arugam Bay

Hey !

Last week I was in holidays ! holidays soooo needed ^^

……

Arugam Bay is a real piece of Paradise. And if you are a surfer, then you do not wish to be somewhere else. The tropical white sand beach, with perfect blue water, palm trees everywhere, and just as I like it when I want to rest… reggae music on the beach with an unlimited source of ice cold beer.

The waves are simply perfect. A nice and long right hand break, going parallel to the beach, and which can be divided in 3 category : big for the advances, medium for the intermediates, and small for the beginners .

When you succeed your take off, you have the wave for yourself for 2 to 3 hundred meters… Simply magic.

My plan in Arugam Bay is pretty simple…   Rest, surf and rest, and surf again… Minimum of 6h per day in the water, and when I’m not in… I am sleeping…

I’d finally not be lucky with the beers, as a major power cut, which lasted for 4 days, had all the fridges in the village off, resulting in an end of the cold beer stock. That is alright, it is a good way to save money.

I’ve met some people while I was there, with whom I could chat a bit. The place is 90% full of Australians who come here for a week to get the waves. Then there Is some English, and finally some French People. It was nice to share our interest into this sport. But I was a bit disappointed to see the spot was over crowed and that in the water no friendship spirit was there, you had to fight to get a wave….

After 7 days sleeping and surfing, I had to put myself in a night bus to reach Colombo, arriving at 4am I must change for the Bus to Puttalam then the one toKalpitiya. After 15h in shitty bus I finally get back to Palagama, starting straight my working day, ready for 3 weeks in a go until my next days off…

from the beginning:

I could take my monthly 6 days, plus, offered by the direction, 2 days for the annual staff trip, giving me 8 days off !! Continue reading ‘Sigiriya and Arugam Bay’

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The Bay today

End June 12 The season comes late this year (note how

the annual sand bank is just forming)

by D. Schenk

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Jet Ski trials at Arugam Bay

Navy The S.L. Navy recently entered the lucrative Tourist market. In a big way, with cruises, boat trips, hospitality and whale watching,

Army The Army also has been taking keen interest in the sport of Surfing. Locally based, Commissioned Officers are said to have been observed to Surf Arugam Bay.

Air Force Jet Ski trials at AbaY

STF – Special Tusk Farce The STF is already actively engaged in life-saving duties and Fishery protection excercises

Fishy protection Duties

Air Farce Not to be outdone, arugam.info has learned that SLAF is now also set to enter the lucrative Tourist sector. So far, none of the Armed Forces appear to be profitable. As jet.

Recently, secret trials were held in the area. Just West of Arugam Bay.

Rigorous training program. Earlier attempts were promising

Jokey Club Furthermore, it is understood that other organisations are considering to jump on the popular Surfing “Band Wagon”

Even the Sri Lanka Jockey Club seems to be considering to divert into some off shore activities:

Jockey Club training session @ Arugam Bay

AbuDubai Race Horses Rulers from the UAE have also spotted Arugam’s potential. Already they have send some of their best Race Horses to be conditioned and trained in the clean air of Arugam’s beaches. Apparently, the humidity and the heat will give Arab based horses a distinct advantage over European competitors in forthcoming races in Dubai’s high Tech race course.

Dubai Horse Race training & conditioning at Arugam Bay

Chinese Interest The Chinese meanwhile have copied popular Jet Ski Designs by Yamaha, Suzuki and Bomadier. Seen here on HD sea trials at AbaY

Ps.: NAAFI? Navy, Army & Air Forces Institutes in action at Arugam Bay 1st April, 2012

Combined Forces. At work in AbaY

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More Than Just Another Surfing Destination

More Than Just Another Surfing Destination

COOLANGATTA, Queensland/Australia (Thursday, 12 January, 2012) –
For the last 2 year ASP Australasia have been involved in the running of one of the most exotic events on the ASP calendar – The SriLankan Airlines Pro.

Beautiful Arugam Bay. Pic ASP/Will H-S

2010 saw the event play host to the world’s best male surfers vying for valuable ASP 6-Star points at the now world renowned Arugam Bay. Julian Wilson (AUS) took out the event, with his radical approach to the long reeling right handers, earning some solid prize-money and points that helped him qualify for the elite ASP World Title Race. (Click here to watch event TV Show.)

In 2011 The SriLankan Airlines Pro changed, the event was the first of it’s kind, two events in one – a 6-Star Women’s event and Men’s World Longboard Title event. Both events were treated to classic waves and unforgettable Sri Lankan hospitality. (Click here for event TV Show.)

If you’ve been wondering which location to select for your next surfing safari, make sure you check out these videos and consider making Sri Lanka’s many long right-handed point breaks your destination.

source:

http://www.aspaustralasia.com.au/2012/01/12/sri-lanka-more-than-just-another-surfing-destination/

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