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Luftwaffe Magazin mentions AbaY !

Aragum is a working Bay

ARUGAM BAY: POTHEADS, SURFERS AND A GREAT DREAM Exploring the real Sri Lanka is best done by bus. What you should know: Buses never use their brakes, and love to overtake. Rock-hard benches, diesel engines that sound like tractors and a Bollywood-style soundtrack are all part of the trip to Arugam Bay. It’s a genuine experience and takes ten hours.

A two-kilometer stretch of street lined with huts, houses and small hotels: This is the east coast’s legendary surf spot. West of the place also known as “A-Bay,” peacocks strut across paddy fields, and further south, elephants lumber through the wilderness. I arrive with a headache, a backache and hurting ears: I need a beer. The Siam View Hotel, owned by A-Bay veteran Fred Netzband-­Miller, 65, serves the best beer, I am told. “I came here in the seventies, to smoke pot and surf,” says the Dutchman. “Then I met a ­local woman. She said there’d be nothing happening between us unless I married her first. So I did – ten days later.”

We are on the roof of his hotel, on the Flower Power Terrace. Over a beer – homemade and excellent, by the way – Fred talks about the wild days in A-Bay – and about the civil war, the battles that raged on other beaches not far from here. Surfers still came to A-Bay, though – for the spectacular waves – if necessary even traveling through the region occupied by the rebel Tamil Tigers. Fred also experienced and survived the 2004 tsunami in A-Bay: “I was up here, partying with my staff. All of a sudden, there was salt water sloshing into my gin and tonic. Absolutely unacceptable!” Then the easy smile he has worn until now disappears. “But seriously, you know: The party saved our lives.”

Others were not so fortunate: Up to 38 000 Sri Lankans lost their lives in the tsunami, among them the father of Irsah and Irfan. On the beach in the morning, I meet the 25-year-old twins, who work as surf instructors and fishermen today. “We were 14,” Irfan says, “and had to quit school because our mother had no money.” Today, they are short of cash again; this time to fullfill the great dream they share. Irsah points to a structure at the top of the beach with no walls, but a large roof about 14 to 15 square meters in area, made of palm leaves and supported by tree trunks. “That’s going to be our surf school,” Irsah tells me, “as soon as we have a few spare rupees, we’ll carry on building, buy some second-hand boards. And then we’ll really make a splash – you’ll see!”

5 Secret Asian Places

Arugam Bay, Sri Lanka
is Number ONE

Why has Sri Lanka sprung to the top of so many ‘must see’ lists? It’s probably got something to do with its mellow vibes, its lively locals, its fusion of culture, cuisine and natural wonder that stands up to any other destination in the region.

In short, Sri Lanka has got it going on, and of all the amazing spots to drop in on in this place, Arugam Bay just might take the cake. Home to one of the world’s most raved-about surf breaks, the golden sands, glittering waters and epic sunsets make for a truly spectacular tropical affair, and with just a single strip of shops and restaurants nearby, Arugam’s star has only begun to rise. Pack an extra bag – you’ll need it when you decide to move here for good.

Source:
http://junkee.com/asian-holiday-destinations/154959

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AbaY remembered

Nate Berkus And His Husband Have A Beautiful Way Of Honoring Nate’s Late Partner

In 2004, Nate’s partner was killed in the devastating tsunami during their visit to (Arugam Bay) – Sri Lanka. But he is “definitely a part of” Nate’s marriage to Jeremiah Brent.

In 2004, it may have seemed hard for Nate Berkus to imagine happiness making its way back into his life. That year, the interior designer had lost his beloved partner, photographer Fernando Bengoechea, when the two found themselves literally swept away by the devastating tsunami that struck Sri Lanka, where they were vacationing. More than 30,000 people in Sri Lanka died in the natural disaster; though Nate survived, the pain of losing Fernando was all-consuming.

“I have the grief to contend with,” Nate told Oprah shortly after the tragedy. “But I do believe that I survived so that I would have a greater understanding both of what I’ve had, what I’ve lost and what I still have to gain.”

Slowly, Nate did begin to heal, and even found ways to honor Fernando’s memory through the years. And perhaps no one is a bigger supporter of honoring Fernando’s memory than Nate’s own husband, Jeremiah Brent.

At their 2014 wedding, Jeremiah Brent told husband Nate Berkus that he honored every part of his past and everything he’d been through, bringing many guests to tears.

Nate married Jeremiah, a fellow interior designer and the host of “Home Made Simple,” in 2014. Oprah was a guest at the wedding, where Jeremiah’s vows to Nate included a nod to Nate’s past relationship.

“That’s a part of our love story. There’s no two ways about it,” Jeremiah tells “Oprah: Where Are They Now?”. “Yes, we’re married this time, but [Fernando is] definitely a part of it.”

He continues, “I oddly feel connected to him. I honor that story.”

Nate Berkus and Fernando Bengoechea were both swept up by the 2004 tsunami during a trip to Sri Lanka. Fernando died in the disaster.

Jeremiah is also determined to keep Fernando’s memory alive for young Poppy, who Nate and Jeremiah welcomed via surrogacy in 2015.

“Our daughter will know who he was,” Jeremiah says. “We have pictures of him in the home.”

While Jeremiah’s approach seems to be one that comes with relative ease, Nate says that his own reconciliation of the past was more of a struggle.

“I didn’t know how to articulate what I needed from a new relationship,” he says. “I didn’t know how to articulate how to keep that and honor that, but still move forward without any guilt or any fear.”

NEW YORK, NY – APRIL 24: (L-R) Nate Berkus and Jeremiah Brent attend the 2014 Good Shepherd Services Spring Party at Stage 37 on April 24, 2014 in New York City. (Photo by Brian Killian/WireImage)

“I worry about anything happening to [Jeremiah],” Nate admits. “I worry, obviously, because I’ve had such great loss. I don’t want to go through that again ? no one does, whether you’ve had it or you haven’t.”

Turning to his husband, Nate continues.

“You were the first person to come into my life and not be threatened or afraid, not afraid to poke the damage and say, ‘That happened. Let’s talk about it. Let’s figure it out, and how can it be part of our world in a way that’s healthy?’” Nate says. “And so it is.”

Nate and Jeremiah’s full interview airs on this weekend’s “Oprah: Where Are They Now?”, on Saturday, Jan. 23, at 10 p.m. ET on OWN.

A previous version of this article stated that 400 people died in the tsunami. In fact, that number referred to the people in the Arugam Bay and Pottuvil region, where Berkus and Bengoechea were staying. The total death toll from the natural disaster was more than 30,000.

source:
https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/nate-berkus-jeremiah-brent-honoring-fernando_us_56a15f52e4b076aadcc5f6b1

September Sunny sets

Col. Karuna Beach Event

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Perfect Weather in AbaY

Sunday, 27th May 2017